Adaptation Studies Reading List

Adaptation Studies: Breadth Field Reading List

My rationale for choosing adaptation theory was both pedagogical and research-oriented. The study of neo-Victorian adaptations of Victorian novels, and other cultural products (plays, poetry, material objects, and general aesthetics) has become an increasingly significant way in which Victorian scholars can demonstrate the continued impact and relevance of the field to contemporary culture and society. A background in adaptation theory will, hopefully, help me to situate my teaching and research within this consideration of cultural relevance and impact of Victorian texts and media. I hope to use adaptation theory in my dissertation to examine the legacies of Victorian sensation fiction in contemporary literature and culture. (I suspect, for example, that the legacies of Victorian sensation fiction exceed obvious lineages such as neo-Victorian or steampunk texts and media to include genres such as urban fantasy and paranormal mysteries.) To these ends, I have included a variety of genres and forms on my Adaptation list. Primary texts include novels, films, television shows, comics, manga, and video games. My theoretical selections include traditional adaptation studies texts as well as pieces outlining more recent developments in the field: convergence theory, transmedia theory, media mix, and etc.

Primary Texts

Book to Film:

  1. Adichie, Chimamanda Ngozi. Half of a Yellow Sun. New York: Knopf, 2007. Print.
  2. Half of a Yellow Sun. Dir. Biyi Bandele. Perf. Chiwetel EjioforThandie NewtonOnyeka OnwenuAnika Noni RoseGenevieve NnajiOC Ukejeand John Boyega. Slate Films, 2014. Film.

Book to Television:

  1. Waters, Sarah. Tipping the Velvet: A Novel. New York: Riverhead Books, 1998. Print.
  2. Tipping the Velvet. Dir. Tim Fywell. Perf. Rachael StirlingKeeley Hawes, and Anna Chancellor. Acorn Media, 2002. DVD.

Comic to Video Game:

  1. Telltale Games. The Wolf Among Us. Vertigo and Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment, 2013. Kindle Fire.
  2. Willingham, Bill (w), Lan Medina (p), and Steve Leialoha (p). “Legends in Exile.” Fables #1 (2002), Vertigo. Comic.

 

Comic to Television:

  1. iZombie. CW. Hulu. Web. 19 Mar. 2015.
  2. Roberson, Chris (w), and Michael Allred (i). “Dead to the World.” iZombie #1 (2011), Vertigo. Comic.

 

Manga to Television to Film:

  1. Black Butler [Kuroshitsuji]. Dirs. Kentarô Ohtani and Kei’ichi Sato. Warner Bros., 2014. Film.
  2. Black Butler. FUNimation. Hulu. Web. 13 Mar. 2015.
  3. Toboso, Yana and Tomo Kimura. Black Butler # 1. New York: Yen Press, 2010. eBook.

Critical Texts

Monographs and Edited Collections:

  1. Allen, Graham. Intertextuality. New York: Routledge, 2000. Print.
  2. Andrew, Dudley. Concepts in Film Theory. New York: Oxford UP, 1984. Print.
  • —. “The State of Film Theory.” Concepts in Film Theory. New York: Oxford UP, 1984. 3-18. Print.
  • —. “Adaptation.” Concepts in Film Theory. New York: Oxford UP, 1984. 96-106. Print.
  1. Bruhn, Jørgen, Anne Gjelsvik, and Eirik Frisvold Hanssen, eds. Adaptation Studies: New Challenges, New Directions. New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2013. Print.
  • —. “‘There and Back Again’: New Challenges and New Directions in Adaptation Studies.” Adaptation Studies: New Challenges, New Directions. New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2013. 3-18. Print.
  • Bruhn, Jø “Dialogizing Adaptation Studies: From One-Way Transport to a Dialogic Two-Way Process.” Adaptation Studies: New Challenges, New Directions. Eds. Jørgen Bruhn, Anne Gjelsvik, and Eirik Frisvold Hanssen New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2013. 69-88. Print.
  • Bryant, John. “Textual Identity and Adaptive Revision: Editing Adaptation as Fluid Text.” Adaptation Studies: New Challenges, New Directions. Eds. Jørgen Bruhn, Anne Gjelsvik, and Eirik Frisvold Hanssen New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2013. 47-68. Print.
  • Elliott, Kamilla. “Theorizing Adaptations / Adapting Theories.” Adaptation Studies: New Challenges, New Directions. Eds. Jørgen Bruhn, Anne Gjelsvik, and Eirik Frisvold Hanssen New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2013. 19-46. Print.
  • Leitch, Thomas. “What Movies Want.” Adaptation Studies: New Challenges, New Directions. Eds. Jørgen Bruhn, Anne Gjelsvik, and Eirik Frisvold Hanssen New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2013. 155-76. Print.
  • Schober, Regina. “Adaptation as Connection—Transmedia Reconsidered.” Adaptation Studies: New Challenges, New Directions. Eds. Jørgen Bruhn, Anne Gjelsvik, and Eirik Frisvold Hanssen New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2013. 89-112. Print.
  1. Carroll, Rachel, ed. Adaptation in Contemporary Culture: Textual Infidelities. New York: Continuum, 2009. Print.
  • —. “Introduction: Textual Infidelities.” Adaptation in Contemporary Culture: Textual Infidelities. New York: Continuum, 2009. 1-10. Print.
  • Marlow, Christopher. “The Folding Text: Doctor Who, Adaptation and Fan Fiction.” Adaptation in Contemporary Culture: Textual Infidelities. New York: Continuum, 2009. 46-59. Print.
  • Emmens, Heather. “Taming the Velvet: Lesbian Identity in Cultural Adaptations of Tipping the Velvet.” Adaptation in Contemporary Culture: Textual Infidelities. New York: Continuum, 2009. 134-46. Print.
  • Weber, Brenda R. “For the Love of Jane: Austen, Adaptation, and Celebrity.” Adaptation in Contemporary Culture: Textual Infidelities. New York: Continuum, 2009. 186-96. Print.
  1. Elliott, Kamilla. Rethinking the Novel/Film Debate. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2003. Print.
  • —. Introduction. Rethinking the Novel/Film Debate. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2003. 1-8. Print.
  • —. “Analogy and Category.” Rethinking the Novel/Film Debate. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2003. 9-26. Print.
  • —. “Cinematic Novels/Literary Cinema.” Rethinking the Novel/Film Debate. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2003. 113-32. Print.
  • —. “Literary Cinema and the Form/Content Debate.” Rethinking the Novel/Film Debate. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2003. 133-83. Print.
  • —. “Adaptation and Analogy.” Rethinking the Novel/Film Debate. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2003. 184-241. Print.
  1. Hutcheon, Linda. A Theory of Adaptation. London: Routledge, 2006. Print.
  2. Jenkins, Henry and Sam Ford. Spreadable Media: Creating Value and Meaning in a Networked Culture. New York: New York UP, 2013. Print.
  • —. “Introduction: Why Media Spreads.” Spreadable Media: Creating Value and Meaning in a Networked Culture. New York: New York UP, 2013. 1-46. Print.
  • —. “The Value of Media Engagement.” Spreadable Media: Creating Value and Meaning in a Networked Culture. New York: New York UP, 2013. 113-52. Print.
  • —. “What Constitutes Meaningful Participation?” Spreadable Media: Creating Value and Meaning in a Networked Culture. New York: New York UP, 2013. 153-94. Print.
  1. Leitch, Thomas. Film Adaptation and Its Discontents: From Gone with the Wind to The Passion of the Christ. London: Johns Hopkins UP, 2007. Print.
  2. Murray, Simone. The Adaptation Industry: The Cultural Economy of Contemporary Literary Adaptation. New York: Routledge, 2013. Print.
  3. Ryan, Marie-Laure, ed. Narrative Across Media: The Languages of Storytelling. Lincoln: U of Nebraska P, 2004. Print.
  • —. Introduction. Narrative Across Media: The Languages of Storytelling. Lincoln: U of Nebraska P, 2004. 1-40.
  • Herman, David. “Toward a Transmedial Narratology.” In Narrative Across Media: The Languages of Storytelling. Marie-Laure Ryan. Lincoln: U of Nebraska P, 2004. 47-75. Print.
  • Steiner, Wendy. “Pictorial Narrativity.” In Narrative Across Media: The Languages of Storytelling. Marie-Laure Ryan. Lincoln: U of Nebraska P, 2004. 145-78. Print.
  1. Ryan, Marie-Laure, and Marina Grishakova, eds. Intermediality and Storytelling. New York: Gruyter and Co., 2010. Print.
  • Grishakova, Marina. “Intermedial Representations.” Intermediality and Storytelling. Eds. Marie-Laure Ryan and Marina Grishakova. New York: Gruyter and Co., 2010. 312-32. Print.
  • Mittell, Jason. “Previously On: Prime Time Serials and the Mechanics of Memory.” Intermediality and Storytelling. Eds. Marie-Laure Ryan and Marina Grishakova. New York: Gruyter and Co., 2010. 78-98. Print.
  • Ryan, Marie-Laure. “Fiction, Cognition, and Non-Verbal Media.” Intermediality and Storytelling. Eds. Marie-Laure Ryan and Marina Grishakova. New York: Gruyter and Co., 2010. 8-26. Print.
  1. Sanders, Julie. Adaptation and Appropriation. Abingdon: Routledge, 2006. Print.
  • —. “What is Adaptation?” Adaptation and Appropriation. Abingdon: Routledge, 2006. 17-25. Print.
  • —. “What is Appropriation?” Adaptation and Appropriation. Abingdon: Routledge, 2006. 26-42. Print.
  1. Steinberg, Marc. Anime’s Media Mix: Franchising Toys and Characters in Japan. Minneapolis: U Minnesota P, 2012. Print.

Articles:

  1. Bourdaa, Melanie. “‘Following the Pattern’: The Creation of an Encyclopaedic Universe with Transmedia Storytelling.” Adaptation 2 (2013): 202-14. Print.
  2. Cobb, Shelley. “Adaptation, Fidelity, and Gendered Discourses.” Adaptation 1 (2009): 34-48. Print.
  3. Collard, Christophe. “Mediaturgy’s Troubled Tensions with Adaptation: Convergence or Divergence?” Adaptation3 (2014): 265-74. Print.
  4. Constandinides, Costas. “Para-Adaptation: Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Convergence Culture.” Adaptation. 6.2 (2013): 143-57. Print.
  5. Jenkins, Henry. “Introduction: ‘Worship at the Altar of Convergence’: A New Paradigm for Understanding Media Change.” Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide. New York: New York UP, 2006. 1-24. Print.
  6. Kallay, Jamina. “Transmedia: the Film-Game Symbiosis.” Gaming Film: How Games are Reshaping Contemporary Cinema. New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2013. 86-95. Print.
  7. Leitch, Thomas. “Adaptation, the Genre.” Adaptation 2 (2008): 106-210. Print.
  8. Moore, Michael Ryan. “Adaptation and New Media.” Adaptation2 (2010): 179-92. Print.
  9. Papazian, Gretchen, and Joseph Michael Sommers. “Introduction: Manifest Narrativity—Video Games, Movies, and Art and Adaptation.” Game On, Hollywood!: Essays on the Intersection of Video Games and Cinema. Jefferson: McFarland, 2013. 8-19. Print.
  10. Ryan, Marie-Laure. “From Narrative Games to Playable Stories: Toward a Poetics of Interactive Narrative.” Storyworlds 1 (2009): 43-59. Project Muse. Web. 30 Mar. 2015.
  11. Stam, Robert. Literature through Film: Realism, Magic, and the Art of Adaptation. Malden: Blackwell, 2005. 1-17. Print.
  12. Verevis, Constantine. “Introduction: Remaking Film.” Film Remakes. Edinburgh: Edinburgh UP, 2006. Print.

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